Tuesday, 9 October 2012

18th Century Female gun crew

This lot are made by 3D Models and are available from CW Toys. They are labelled as Female napoleonics 1789, but I´m using them as Female Bodstonians..the "Purple Roses",which means they have the best deal..they get to go 50 years back in time :-D

The 4 women with their 2Pdr  "Long Tom"
Master Gunner Juliet Pride
 
A bit of history about the unit over in Bodstonia.

Hello to Ni.Tchirititch from Nowhere to Lead Soldiers blog. Great Saga minis and warganing
Hello to  Adam from One Man´s Armies blog. He´s just started out in model blogging
Hello to Sean Stone , Thanks for following :-D

23 comments:

  1. This is a really nice group of figures Paul. And very well painted.

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  2. Hard to "authentically" take them back 50 years. The loose hair is definitely Revolutionary as is the lack of corsetry that flattened and pushed up the bosoms in the mid 1700s. The waistcoats would have to be mid thigh.

    Paul, don't touch a thing on these little figures.
    Great work.

    These figs might inspire me to do a 54mm female gun crew.

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  3. Waw your his sexy girls Paul, still a nice scene, good painting I like .
    Cheers
    Greetings

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  4. They turn out quite well, no doubt thanks to your paintjob (I read unfavorable comments about the casting).
    Their large tricornes (more in evidence on the infantry) are almost WSS, thus using them for ca. 1750 is a good mathematical average.
    Are they available again, did the importer surfaced from the spatio-temporal hole where seemingly he had disappeared?

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    1. Thanks Jean Louis.
      They are indeed available again..and the molds seem to be in order, only very slight mold lines in these and thier "sister" set.
      Cheers
      paul

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  5. Those are very curious sculpts. They manage to look quite sexy and curvy despite all that period clothing. Reaper and Hasselfree could take note of that. I like what you've done with them and how you have integrated them into the story of Bodstonia. More proof that the female of the species is more deadly than the male.
    Cheers,
    Mike

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  6. They look great - the sculptor really did a fine job on these. Best, Dean

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  7. What a charming bunch of young ladies!

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  8. Really nice...and sexy! Rare in wargames! Good work...
    Phil.

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  9. Beautiful painting and very nice figs.

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  10. Very unusual figures Paul, Buxom Wenches R Us!

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  11. Weird and wonderful, more bang for your buxom!

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  12. These look hot and superbly painted.

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  13. Very buxom lot, brilliant lot Paul!

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  14. They are beautiful (and now we can use that word properly!)!
    I was thinking on getting a set for myself (going to write to Santa!) and do something like you did, not quite "Napoleonic".

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  15. They are great...hello ladies!

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  16. Cheers for these great fugures Paul. Didn't realise that anything could look so good in breeches and knee-length gaiters. I am particularly taken by the pose of that buxom young lady with the rammer. I would be tempted to say something like 'she could swab out my gun barrel anytime' but that would be wrong so I won't.

    ;-) Doc

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    1. European reenactment units don't seem to mind women in the ranks. It's hard to hide the female form in 18th century breeches and gaiters. Eastern European 7 Year War and Napoleonic groups tend to have women in the ranks.

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  17. nice work paul but we all know that they were sculpted purely for a laugh... at least I hope so. great painting work my freind

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  18. Oh la la!

    You know its great work when the Padre gets on board!

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  19. I am probably thinking about this set of figures way too much.
    My slim but respectable knowledge of field guns and fortress and siege guns tells me that this crew is only dressed for serving a fixed position piece because they are able to remove their leather gear, hats and coats. Field artillery and horse artillery crew would not be able to undress like this and have time to be mobile on the battlefield if they had to gear up then move the gun. Period paintings may be showing field artillery in full uniforms and kit because the real crew had to have all their gear handy to be ready to move.

    I remember some debate about this in US Civil War reenacting
    because most recreated units never move from the spot once set up for a reenactment so they shed their gear. (trucks and trailers rather than horses and limbers.) Plus they do not have the horses to hang their person gear on.

    I still really like these figures as we're talking historical fantasy here.

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  20. That was quick! And you painted them very nice! Good choice for letting them live in Bodstonia!

    Greetings
    Peter
    http://peterscave.blogspot.be/

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